7 things we still miss from Guild Wars 1

An update from Guild Wars 2 has provided for joyful dances: Since December 3, there are cloaks as backs in the game. For those who have not played Guild Wars 1, this change is incomprehensible, because in the predecessor of Arenanets MMORPG they were an integral part – each character could represent with these capes his guild. By introducing a standard version and a magnificent version (from the gemstone shop) nostalgics now feel a little closer to the beloved first part. But by checking off the cape on the wish list, veterans are far from satisfied. We still want those things from Guild Wars 1 back:

1. Scythians, Geistrufer, Commander

As we transitioned from Guild Wars to its successor, we had to leave behind a lot of mechanics, content and achievements – but hardly anyone hurts as much as the loss of various classes. While we can continue to play Warrior, Mesmer, Ranger, Elementalist, Assassin (now Thief), and Necromancer, other roles with Guild Wars 2 have disappeared. Monks, dervishes, paragons, and ritualists had to give way to the engineer, guard, and opponent. Some players may now say "In Warrior and Guardian is much of Paragon, Monk, and Ritualist"But let's be honest: this is not the same, not nearly. And who became one with wind and desert, to work on several opponents simultaneously with the scythe of the dervish, finds only weak consolation in a dervish outfit and scythe from the gemstone shop. Especially the unique weapons like javelins and scythes have made the Nightfall classes Dervish and Paragon iconic. In this respect: At any time, dear developers!






Ritualist, Paragon and Dervish in Guild Wars 1: Although some mechanics and skills are now found in other classes in GW2, veterans would still be pleased to see them return.



Ritualist, Paragon and Dervish in Guild Wars 1: Although some mechanics and skills are now found in other classes in GW2, veterans would still be pleased to see them return.

Source: buffed




2nd Guild vs. Guild – where the best in GW1 have measured themselves

A game called "Guild Wars" … should be about fighting guilds as well, can that be? In GW1, there was a clear focus on development in the competitive field, especially through the competitions where guilds have fought even in their own halls. In the second part of the MMORPG only the name remained. Although PvP and WvW continue to exist, unlike Guild Wars 1, they do not have a separate guild-versus-guild mode. In doing so, the player have been wanting since release of GW2: Unofficial matches take place again and againGuilds, for example, come to organized battles in Obsidian Retreat – with rules and high scores. But without an official framework, this activity could never reach a broad mass. While in Guild Wars 1, the best guilds earned fame and honor by leading rankings in the Hall of Heroes.

3. Alliance Battles – the sweet spot between WvW and PvP

In Guild Wars 2 (buy now for 39,95 €) There is a lot of peace, joy and pancakes between the peoples themselves, and even in the predecessor, players have only been in sport in PvP matches. However, the Factions extension has shaken things up: Luxon and Kurzick have split the community and defined some faction-specific features. In alliance battles, three teams of four competed against each other and fought for the control of shrines. "But is not that just WvW?"someone asks. The answer: Not really, because WvW is completely open world, no balance or "action" guaranteed. Alliance battles were large-scale PvP matches, but they also revolved around story and PvE features. In this way, this mode has done a wonderful balancing act and was therefore much visited.






The alliance fights of Guild Wars: Factions were a great fusion of PvE and PvP - but unlike WvW from GW2 with no downtime.



The alliance fights of Guild Wars: Factions were a great fusion of PvE and PvP – but unlike WvW from GW2 with no downtime.

Source: buffed




4. Guild Wars: Weapons in all colors of the rainbow

Many MMORPGs have differently colored weapons simply as separate levels or rarities, but in Guild Wars 1 we were allowed to color as the mood takes us. Of course, there were exceptions (for example, for most unique weapons), but for a majority of the staffs, bows, swords & Co players were allowed to romp. In Guild Wars 2, unlike our predecessor, we no longer pay for applying colors, only for unlocking. Armor, gliders, outfits and mounts are indeed dyeable (even partially in several colors), but weapons are excluded from this system. Why? There is no real answer, maybe the developers wanted to use colors as in other MMORPGs to make different sets easier, like for example, the ancient weapons.






Gun Coloring in Guild Wars 1: The results were not always overwhelming, but in the picture, for example, a Voltaic spear is so stained that the handle is purple.



Gun Coloring in Guild Wars 1: The results were not always overwhelming, but in the picture, for example, a Voltaic spear is so stained that the handle is purple.

Source: buffed




5. Tailored armor for each class

While we have to make do without beloved animal sets in WoW: Battle for Azeroth, so no new class-specific armor is available, Guild Wars 2 has since adopted this concept. It was different in Guild Wars 1: although there were only a handful of sets, they were all adapted to the different classes.






In Guild Wars 1, armor was still quality rather than quantity: as each class received its own armor, there was only a handful. But they could be seen.



In Guild Wars 1, armor was still quality rather than quantity: as each class received its own armor, there was only a handful. But they could be seen.

Source: buffed




The Canthan divide, for example, looked completely unique to Mesmers, monks, and Elementalists. In Guild Wars 2, there are probably two good reasons for this: adaptable bodies and different peoples. The developers already seem to have problems with designing armor that fits a Charr as well as a human. In addition variants for the classes? Sigh. Nevertheless, at least 1-2 sets of this kind would be a great endgame goal.

6. The auction house of GW2 is great, but …

… what about the good old trading from player to player? If you find something cool in Guild Wars 2 that you want to sell to someone else, it still has to go to the auction house – absurd, right? You can send it to him, but it takes a lot of confidence to send the gold for it as well. The personal component has thus disappeared, as lanky as that sounds. This auction house and personal trading would not bite! A simple exchange system between adventurers should be easily integrated into the game.






The direct trade in Guild Wars 1 was tiring at times, but would not have to disappear by the introduction of the auction house in GW2 anyway.



The direct trade in Guild Wars 1 was tiring at times, but would not have to disappear by the introduction of the auction house in GW2 anyway.

Source: buffed




7. Hall of Monuments to our achievements

Guild Wars: Eye of the North was the first expansion without a completely new continent, but the new territories, dungeons and other content have made up for it. The Hall of Monuments, in particular, was a great feature because it had two goals: to capture the masterly accomplishments of our heroes. And on the other hand, unlock Rewards in Guild Wars 2, as we've secured armor sets, achievement points, titles, minis, and weapons in the sequel.






In Guild Wars, Hall of Monuments unlocked rewards for our characters in Guild Wars 2. Collecting weapons of war, destroyer weapons, elite armor, achievement trophies, and companion statues was a great incentive to play.



In Guild Wars, Hall of Monuments unlocked rewards for our characters in Guild Wars 2. Collecting weapons of war, destroyer weapons, elite armor, achievement trophies, and companion statues was a great incentive to play.

Source: buffed




This does not mean that Guild Wars 3 must come to justify a new kind of Hall of Monuments. But it would still be desirable if we could present special armor sets, defeated enemies, lavish titles & Co somewhere appropriate. The guild hall does not fit, it is there for the services of a larger community. How about our home instance, for example? This is not exhausted enough anyway, except for the reduction of resources.


Which Guild Wars features are still on your mental wish list? Would you like to have NPC heroes who accompany you? Should we unlock abilities via ruffractions again? Is the trip missing in Riss or Underworld? Write us in the comments!

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