Arboria Preview: How good is the trolly Rogue-lite from Dreamplant? – Games up to date

The Early Access version of the rogue-lite action role-playing game Arboria was launched on May 7, 2020 available on Steam. Since the game is currently still in early access, the question naturally arises as to whether it is worth trying it out in its current state. In order to get to the bottom of this question, we have been dealing with Arboria for quite a while and the answer is very clear: yes and no.

The best thing to do is to start from scratch before we dive into the world of Durnar and its troll inhabitants.

Options? What is that supposed to be?







We begin our journey to the land of Durnar in the skin of the troll Gobbok - but it should not stay that way for long.



We begin our journey to the land of Durnar in the skin of the troll Gobbok – but it should not stay that way for long.

Source: PC games




What is already noticeable in the main menu: the game is not finished. Sure, it's early access too. Nevertheless, it is a little strange to find an option to set the language or subtitles in the menus, for example, but these buttons simply do not respond when you click the mouse. It looks similar in the graphics options, although we can adjust the general level of detail here, additional options such as deactivating motion blur are not yet available. When it comes to the sound options, it gets strange because we can fully adjust the sound, but the game seems to ignore our selected settings in places. As a result, some sound effects are fired at full volume despite the change. This is clearly not a pleasure for headset wearers. But no matter who has been in the settings for a long time?

My hat it has three corners…







After Gobbok has found his new hat, he literally goes crazy with joy.



After Gobbok has found his new hat, he literally goes crazy with joy.

Source: PC games




With such a new and creative title, the story is much more important. And it is, well, creative. We slip into the skin of a so-called Yotunz, a kind of troll who is on a mission with a fairy to save the sick father tree, the source of life. The troll Gobbok and the fairy explore a kind of underground mine through which the corrupted roots of the tree run. They quickly come across another Yotun's body wearing a strange hat. Without thinking about it for a long time, Gobbok grabs the headgear and apparently goes mad with this hat on.

He runs deeper into the mine because he thinks he can find the gods below. He thus becomes the antagonist of the game and the fairy who had previously accompanied him now summons other Yotun to stop him. And that's where we come in. Before we dive into the gameplay, let's say: Yes, the world of Arboria is hardly explained and the story is strange and confused and it stays that way, at least during the section available in Early Access. The getting used to writing style contributes to this impression, because everything is written in a kind of slang. Reading the English subtitles is a bit of a challenge from time to time. "All thankz to hiz hat. Has iz a betta friend den a stupid fairy." And not only do the dialogs run like this, the Lore texts under Items and Equipment also look like this. Some of the strange writing is very funny and charming, but it also drifts quickly into strange and strange teenage humor. For example, the Lore text on the shock wave ability reads: "Da real shockwave comez out of my azz."

Simple troll, diverse combat system







Arboria: Our preview of the promising Rogue-lite role-playing game from Dreamplant. (2)



Arboria: Our preview of the promising Rogue-lite role-playing game from Dreamplant. (2)

Source: PC games




Speaking of skills, we wanted to come to gameplay. At the beginning we choose one of three randomly generated trolls with different bonuses and character values ​​and descend again into the caves. The mine levels to be explored are generated randomly and are therefore structured differently in each game cycle. Through these random levels we fight with a soul-like fighting system, which is sometimes a bit imprecise and difficult to handle. Fighting is also made difficult by the fact that our character has no hit feedback. It doesn't flinch when attacking an opponent, there is no sound or graphical information, especially against a group of ranged combatants, which means that you quickly lose track of what is happening and take damage without knowing exactly where the attack came from. The fighting is spiced up by an additional feature.

In addition to our normal melee weapon, we can equip various support abilities, such as a teleport or the aforementioned shock wave. These skills each have an alternative mode, which initially makes for a good variety in the fights. For example, with the teleport we can not only quickly cover short distances and dodge attacks, we can also vanish for a long time to elegantly escape a larger group of opponents.

The gray everyday life of the Yotun







In battle you prefer to keep your distance.



In battle you prefer to keep your distance.

Source: PC games




Arboria in his current state would still need a bit more variety, because unfortunately the game gets monotonous in all respects pretty quickly. The randomly generated dungeons basically always look the same and the mostly gray-green caves are not a feast for the eyes with all love. There are three types of weapons. While these always have different modifications such as ability bonuses or cause elemental damage such as frost or fire damage, the perks do not change the handling itself.

At best we encountered types of opponents four or five, especially on the first two floors of the mine you mostly fight against the same wasp opponents, which quickly gets tiring. At the end of the fourth floor there is a "miniboss", which is also only a known type of opponent with hardly noticeable modifications. Not even the additional skills spice things up after several hours, because there are currently only about three different variations, which are also only expanded by elementary features and the like.

Progress is in the Veri







Arboria: Our preview of the promising Rogue-lite role-playing game from Dreamplant. (3)



Arboria: Our preview of the promising Rogue-lite role-playing game from Dreamplant. (3)

Source: PC games




Unfortunately, farming in the world of Arboria quickly becomes sluggish because of these weaknesses. Too bad, when the actual game principle is designed to grind through the same levels over and over again. In our underground battles, we collect so-called Veri, similar to the souls in Dark Souls. We can secure this in a kind of bank after each level. Collecting Veri is essential for progress, because if we are inattentive and die with our current character, it will be lost forever along with the equipment it has earned.

We can invest the Veri collected by him in our next attempt, for example by buying upgrades in the hub world or by sacrificing the Veri to the gods. If you are generous with your savings, the latter gives you up to ten bonus points on each of the character's main attributes. However, if you do not sacrifice enough to the gods, they become angry and can even deduct skill points from the next character. Only by collecting Veri can you progress further in the dungeon and have a chance to see the end of the game. Or you just ignore everything and run past every fight. Yes, you read that correctly, unfortunately you can reach the end of the current early access version with your feet alone, without fighting even once. For example, this could easily be prevented by inevitable boss fights in the future.

Beetle-free dungeons … almost!







A lot of humor unexpectedly appears in the item descriptions.



A lot of humor unexpectedly appears in the item descriptions.

Source: PC games




We would like to praise that in addition to the quirks already mentioned, we encountered relatively few bugs or glitches during the test. Here and there an enemy got stuck in the ground, an enemy could not be targeted or the frame rate dropped a bit, but all of this is completely forgivable for the current status of the game. There was only one gross error when we suddenly couldn't use our equipped ability anymore. Switching the ability couldn't fix this bug either, so we finally bit the grass. For the fact that the game has only been on the market for a few days, the current technical status is absolutely acceptable. Well-known developers from the triple-A area have already delivered significantly worse things.

The fruit is not yet ripe

Arboria is really not a bad game, but to be a really good game and worth the purchase price, it is still too immature and offers too little variety and scope. In the current state, you can have a lot of fun with the game for a moment, but you can recommend the title without reservation to only those who have one bold indie studio want to support a committed project.

bargain


    • pcgameshardware.de


      Post picture to deals, earn money