No Straight Roads gets bogged down on its way to the top of the charts. As the indie rock duo Bunk Bed Junction, consisting of the hyperactive guitarist Mayday and the laid-back drummer Zuke, you try to free the city of Vinyl City from the clutches of the EDM monopoly No Straight Roads. For this, the duo competes against various artists of the label, such as a robot boy band or a virtual pop star. Between the sprawling boss fights that make up the majority of the game, you "explore" the small, linearly structured and pretty lifeless city.


Vinyl City, city of boredom







To get to the next boss fight, you have to walk through the desolate city. And always through areas that have already been visited. Pretty dreary.



To get to the next boss fight, you have to walk through the desolate city. And always through areas that have already been visited. Pretty dreary.

Source: Computec Media GmbH




Various collectibles are supposed to arouse the spirit of discovery, but rather arouse indifference: whether you attach a discovered sticker that increases the melee attack by two percent does not matter, and it is hardly worth the effort to get failed lamps with bagged batteries to work again. In addition, the controls of Zuke and Mayday – you switch between the two characters at the push of a button or play in co-op mode – feels imprecise. When jumping, the two float weightlessly through the area, they slide over corners and edges like a piece of butter. Combined with the often locked, inconvenient camera, you are simply happy to have to complete as few platforming sections as possible.

But you can't avoid these at the latest in boss fights. Each challenger must first be reached by completing linear sections. There are not only gruesome jumping challenges, but also robot opponents – of which there are only four types. No straight roads (buy now for 49.71 €) does not see itself as a rhythm game, but most of the opponent's attacks (fighting takes place in real time) takes place in time.






First you have to figure it out: In this boss fight you have to avoid the notes with your hands. Hits make beautiful clapping sounds.



First you have to figure it out: In this boss fight you have to avoid the notes with your hands. Hits make beautiful clapping sounds.

Source: Computec Media GmbH




On the other hand, it is mostly unimportant whether you follow the beat. The result: the music is far too little integrated into the gameplay. A lot of audio cues about attack patterns are unclear, your own moves make a few noises but don't expand the track, so you never feel the urge to stay in time. No Straight Roads has no groove, it stumbles along like a novice dancer in a wedding crash course.

Particularly annoying are the poor controls and cameras as well as the inadequate integration of melodic effects in a game that sees itself as an ode to music. However, the problems don't stop there. On the developer’s website, the team explains that the game does not want to rely on cutscenes to tell the story. This credo was obviously thrown overboard during the work on No Straight Roads, because conversations constantly interrupt the action, which could not have been presented in the form of text boxes and minimally animated 2D avatars. The fact that the dialogues turn out to be extremely dull ultimately motivates us to fall asleep or skip it.







Before you get to the boss, you always have to beat up the same opponents and master platforming sections.



Before you get to the boss, you always have to beat up the same opponents and master platforming sections.

Source: Computec Media GmbH




The combat system has no lock-on mechanics, which is why hits are constantly wasted, which affects both the combo counter and the fun factor. Which enemy attacks cause how much damage appears arbitrary. Sometimes it is not even clear how to respond to or ward off certain attacks. It's just stupid when bosses keep us in stunlock and with a game over the whole fight starts all over again, so that you have to master all phases again. And many of these phases take too long, be it because of excessive animation or because there is currently nothing to do.

Although the developers are not lacking in creativity, they have the expertise to put their ideas into practice in a fun way and sometimes to say "Do we really need this feature?" Such prank candidates include the skill tree, the accessible upper world, yes, even the focus on music. There are nice moments all over the place in No Straight Roads, for example the first boss fight in which we hit a DJ planet in the face, or the confrontation with the robot boy band who has a catchy song behind them. The latter, however, can be said of a shockingly few pieces of music in the game. To list all the other little problems of game design would go beyond the scope of this article. Amusing: after we went on the boards at a boss, we were able to activate the finishing move from the game-over screen and still win post mortem. All in all, the game is not worth recommending because of its numerous problems.

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Also popular with PC games readers No Straight Roads in the preview: How much is the upcoming rhythm-action game rocking? "Src =" https://www.pcgames.de/screenshots/237x133/2020/07/Unbenannt-pc-games_b2teaser_169.JPGPcNSWPS4XBO

No Straight Roads in preview: Time to turn the boxes!

In our preview we take a close look at the rocking action title No Straight Roads by Metronomik.

A handful of nice melodies
Music is nothing more than a gimmick
Imprecise controls, bland combat and combo system
Dead, tiny upper world full of senseless collecting stuff
Far too many boring dialogues
Boss fights are drawn out a lot
Unclear visual and acoustic information
Camera often unusable

Like a guitar with 12 detuned strings: No Straight Roads is a single dissonance.

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