Star Trek: The Best Klingons

Star Trek Online recently announced the year of the Klingon. The perfect opportunity to take a closer look at one of our favorite Star Trek races. The Klingons could not only gain a permanent place in the Roddenberry universe. The populace also finds fans in pop cultural allusions, rap songs and even on Christmas cards who have nothing else to do with Star Trek. The popularity of the Klingons is easy to explain. The majority of all viewers see the great warriors with the wild look as entertaining, loud and honorable space Vikings. In addition to their warlike successes, the people have a lot of potential for humor, for example, when Klingon mating rituals are celebrated or enterprise crew member Worf is moved to tears by a thundering Klingon opera.

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The truth, as every real trekker knows, is a little more complicated. Because the relationship between the Federation and the Klingon Empire has changed drastically over the years. Since the spaceship enterprise episode "Battle for Organia", Klingons have been the Federation's dearest enemies and worst friends. The culture of the people is as complex as their diplomatic relationships: The Klingon understanding of honor often has little to do with the human interpretation of the Word to do, while the feudal state system, which is built around the "big houses" and "the high council", can hardly be seen by people. The icing on the cake is a twisted story, around genetic modification, which explains the disappearance and reappearance of the famous forehead lines: Klingons are complicated, loud and unique and that is precisely why we love them. In our list, we present the top 10 Klingons across all films and series in the Star Trek universe. We give reasons for our choice, as well as the consequences in which you can admire our favorite warriors in their full glory.

10th place: col






He has too many nostrils, but an enormous screen presence: Kol is one of the few Discovery Klingons who deserve a place on the list.



He has too many nostrils, but an enormous screen presence: Kol is one of the few Discovery Klingons who deserve a place on the list.

Source: CBS




The list of our best Klingons starts with a Discovery Klingon! We already have the horrified comments of some trekkers in mind, but listen to us before you send our comment column to Gre'Thor. The reason for our 10th place nomination is primarily the talent of actor Kenneth Mitchell, who coped extremely well with the new (and extremely rigid) Klingon prostheses from Star Trek: Discovery. Kor's facial expression is expressive, while Mitchell's height and fitness do not make Kol's movements as rigid as those of his colleagues – in order to admire Kol in all its splendor, we recommend the "Algorithm" episode. The representative of the House of Kor and General of the Klingon Offensive embodies the uncompromising will to conquer and the lust for dominance that is in every Klingon in such a disgusting way that we once and for all wished the "petaQ" death. Kor is aggressive, sadistic and extremely physical. By the way, Mitchell returned in Season 2 to play Kol's father Kol'Sha and also excelled in this role as an unscrupulous warrior. Kol is the best thing that could have happened in the first season of Star Trek: Discovery, which was rather mixed in the eyes of many fans.

9th place: Kruge






Kruge shaped the warlike behavior and the explosiveness of all subsequent Klingon generations. A much underestimated Klingon from Star Trek III.



Kruge shaped the warlike behavior and the explosiveness of all subsequent Klingon generations. A much underestimated Klingon from Star Trek III.

Credit: Paramount / Paramount Pictures




In the film itself we never find out the name of the Klingon captain, but he almost drove Kirk mad and we love him for it: Kruge was the main antagonist in Star Trek III: In Search of Mr. Spock. Here, too, it is the actor who accounts for a large part of the fascination, because Christopher Lloyd's appearance forever shaped the behavior of all subsequent Klingon generations. Even if we were able to take a quick look at the "new" Klingons in Star Trek: The film, it was Kruge who made the makeup, the costumes and the hot-blooded but effective way of fighting space fights socially acceptable. Kruge's intense stare and emotional outbursts are the pattern according to which many of the Klingon encounters from the Star Trek series: The Next Century took place. Wild, impulsive and filled with brutal cunning, Kruge provides us with a Klingon enemy as we wish.

8th place: Lursa and B'Ethor






The two sisters Lursa and B'Ethor, as skilful and unscrupulous politicians, were excellent opponents for Captain Picard.



The two sisters Lursa and B'Ethor, as skilful and unscrupulous politicians, were excellent opponents for Captain Picard.

Credit: Paramount / Paramount Pictures




The two sisters Lursa and B'Ethor were members of the House of Duras and went over dead bodies to bring their family to the head of the empire. In contrast to the openly bellicose Klingons Kor and Kruge, Lursa and B'Ethor represent the intriguing side of Klingon nature. The sisters are made to serve as a counterpoint to Captain Picard, because as "supervisor of the successor" it was Picard's job to keep a close eye on the choice of the new Klingon Chancellor. Lursa and B'Ethor not only use the diplomatic route to put their candidate on the throne, but also poison attacks, contacts with Bajoran Kohn-Ma terrorists, and an alliance with the Romulan star empire. The consequence of these intrigues was the beginning of the Klingon civil war, which ended with the victory of Gowron. Lursa and B'Ethor show that it is in Klingon nature to view every conflict as a fight, even if it is fought on the diplomatic floor – and that your own honor does not mean that every Klingon will be able to win by all means. To see Lursa and B'Ethor in action, we recommend the episodes "The Battle for the Klingon Empire, Part II and II"

7th place: Kaga






For some, the boiling bard belongs to number 1: Kaga regularly steals the main actors of Deep Space Nine in his scenes from the show.



For some, the boiling bard belongs to number 1: Kaga regularly steals the main actors of Deep Space Nine in his scenes from the show.

Credit: Paramount / Paramount Pictures




You don't know who Kaga is? No wonder, because the name only appears in Star Trek books. Nevertheless, he is one of the coolest Klingons of all time: the owner of the Klingon snack on Deep Space Nine! Kaga represents the chocolate side of the pop cultural Klingon, because he has the physique of a Negh'Var battleship and the soul of a bard. The jovial chef doesn't know how to turn his voice down to room volume, he sings blaring arias and he is always concerned about the satisfaction of his customers – even if he has to stomp up and down armed with a Klingon accordion between the tables. Actor Ronald James Taylor gives the snack owner such an endearing personality that he almost steals the show from regular actors. You can admire Kaga in the DS9 episodes "The Melora Problem" and "The Trill Candidate", but you shouldn't miss the two appearances.

6th place: B'Elanna Torres






She is half a Klingon, but she is emotionally full: B'Elanna Torres shows us that Klingon blood burns hot, regardless of the form.



She is half a Klingon, but she is emotionally full: B'Elanna Torres shows us that Klingon blood burns hot, regardless of the form.

Credit: Paramount / Paramount Pictures




The engineer at Voyager combines human and Klingon blood. The concept is nothing new in itself, as Spock, as a semi-Vulcan, also has to cope with his split world of emotions. Half-Klingon K'Ehleyr also appeared in the Enterprise spaceship: The next century and reminded us of the existence of the so-called half-breeds. But in the case of B'Elanna, there is a dramatic difference: she expresses her feelings unfiltered. As so often, the character needs a little to get going, but at the latest with the episode "The Bark of the Dead" B'Elanna proves that she also deserves a place in this list as a half-breed. If you want to dive deeper into the dual nature of the half-Klingon, we recommend the two episodes "Face to Face" and "Day of Honor".

5th place: Chang






General Chang heard at the end of the film, as he would say, "ring the bells at midnight". His appearances are unforgettable.



General Chang heard at the end of the film, as he would say, "ring the bells at midnight". His appearances are unforgettable.

Credit: Paramount / Paramount Pictures




Where Lursa and B'Ethor flaunt scheming wills to power, Chang embodies the master strategist who is a bit in every Klingon. In Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country, General Chang skilfully takes apart the pop-cultural image of the drinking Viking by doing one move at a time. Actor Christopher Plummer does such great overacting that he outperforms Kirk actor Shatner. Not only Picard can quote Shakespeare, but Chang often and often makes use of the old master. Even if you don't like the films with the first series crew, we recommend that you at least take a look at the courtroom scene in which Chang Captain Kirk and Pille literally take apart on the legal floor. By the way, Worf actor Michael Dorn can be seen in the role of the Klingon lawyer.

4th place: Gowron





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Gowron, how he lives and lives: Without his characteristic wild look, the incompetent and greedy Chancellor would only be half as entertaining.

Credit: Paramount / Paramount Pictures




As one of the absolute fan favorites, Gowron almost gets a place on the podium. The Chancellor embodies practically everything that goes wrong in the Klingon Empire in one character. He wants to be a master of intrigue, but only manages to turn practically all superpowers against him. He wants to be a strategist, but starts two-front wars that he cannot win. As a sometimes incompetent political manipulator, he almost single-handedly manages to play the Alpha Quadrant in the Dominion's hands – and we love him for it! Robert O'Reilly plays Gowron so arrogantly and with a characteristic wild stare that it is a real pleasure to hate the character. For a wild mix of struggle and intrigue, we recommend the episode "Fight by all means".

3rd place: Martok






Original only with a missing eye: Martok is a reflected statesman and capable of personal growth - not a matter of course for Klingons.



Original only with a missing eye: Martok is a reflected statesman and capable of personal growth – not a matter of course for Klingons.

Credit: Paramount / Paramount Pictures




J.G Hertzler already enthused fans as General Martok with his first appearance in DS9: his attitude was impressive and his voice iron. Martok, after being rescued from a prisoner-of-war camp, had a close bond with Worf. Not only that, he even took him into his own house when House Mogh, Worf's strongest connection to his Klingon roots, was dissolved. Martok is not only a father figure for Worf, but also a shining example of an honorable, strong and competent Klingon statesman. It is no wonder that the Chancellor's coat ended up on Martok's shoulders. To experience Martok's wisdom and growth as a warrior in action, we recommend the appropriately named episode "Martok's Honor".

2nd place: Worf






He embodies the Klingon will and sheer invincibility of a true warrior: Worf is one of the best Klingons ever.



He embodies the Klingon will and sheer invincibility of a true warrior: Worf is one of the best Klingons ever.

Credit: Paramount / Paramount Pictures




Like Martok, Worf is an excellent example of the ideal Klingon. He's not always perfect and he makes mistakes, but in the end he manages to grow from his defeats. Worf was taken in by people, lost his son's mother and raised him afterwards. He got married and watched his wife die. Worf found and buried his brother in one breath. He became a hero, a traitor and, by the way, took apart Borg drones in the weightlessness of space with a "mek'leth". Whenever there was something to fight, experience or feel, Worf was there – and he always kept his interpretation of Klingon honor in all of this. Worf was more Klingon than most Klingons in this regard – shortcuts were out of the question for him. Actor Michael Dorn created a legend with his portrayal of the Worf.

The so-called "Worf effect" is of course amusing. This means that the warrior is beaten every time if he subsequently faces a strong opponent – only then does the danger really come into play. The episode "In the Light of Inferno" turns this meme upside down. When Worf is defeated by a Jem'Hadar in a prison camp time and time again and again, the Jem'Hadar surprisingly gives up. His explanation: "I cannot defeat this Klingon. I can only kill him." True words.

1st place: Cor






Whether in DS9 or Spaceship Enterprise: Kor the Dahar Master is the essence of what makes a Klingon. Legendary in life, honorable in death.



Whether in DS9 or Spaceship Enterprise: Kor the Dahar Master is the essence of what makes a Klingon. Legendary in life, honorable in death.

Credit: Paramount / Paramount Pictures




The old Klingon Kor is a Dahar master. The word is composed of "Da" (corporal) and "Har" (belief). In other words, it embodies the physical, mental and spiritual ideal on which other Klingons should orient themselves. We believe that the ancient warrior has earned its rank. Kor made his first appearance in the spaceship Enterprise episode "Battle for Organia", in which there is a peace agreement between the Federation and the Klingon Empire for the first time. A long time later Kor appears again in the DS9 episode "The Blood Oath" – in which he is played again by actor John Colicos. The aging Klingon is now drinking too much and is beginning to feel his age. Despite everything, Kor, thanks to the strong performance of Colicos, exudes the personality of a legendary warrior. He is quick-witted, often drunk and extremely charming. His larger-than-life personality becomes even clearer in the episode "The Sword of the Kahless", in which he searches for the weapon of the first emperor together with Worf and Jadzia. However, it is his death that gives Kor an eternal first place on our list (and in Sto'Vo'Kor). Faced with his own age and mortality, he stunned Worf to take his place in a suicide squad. Kor manages to stop an entire Jem'Hadar fleet with a single ship and dies a heroic death in this way. In the last scene of the episode "The Dahar Master", the entire bridge of the Klingon Bird of Prey sings a battle song in honor of the old master. His last words? "Long live the Klingon Empire." Take care, Kol. May you fight eternal battles with your companions Koloth and Kang in the "Sto'Vo'Kor".

We are already excited: Do you agree with our list? Did we forget someone or would you rearrange the list? Let us know in the comments!

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