Yes, Your Grace: Review – Indie-Adventure meets Medieval-RPG – Gamesaktuell

Anyone who thinks that a king would just hang around on the throne and enjoy the good life will be taught in Yes, Your Grace. The unusual mix of medieval simulation, adventure and role-playing lets us feel the burden of the crown violently by confronting us with tricky decisions from early to late. The gameplay is simple, often monotonous – and still motivated us in the test to the end credits.

Retro Royal

With its coarse-pixel design, one could think Yes, Your Grace is a classic point-and-click adventure. A fallacy! We actually have to search for a few items in the game and combine them in the inventory, but that only makes up a tiny part of the game experience. We spend most of our time in the throne room, where we receive discontented subjects for an audience. While some citizens have only modest wishes, others directly drive the lines of worry into our faces: angry farmers complain, for example, about poaching bandits and demand compensation. Others fail to harvest, begging for grain to feed their families. Shortly afterwards, a father begs us for a ransom with which he wants to buy his kidnapped daughter free. Or a host wants to open a tavern and asks for the necessary start-up capital, but in return promises a small profit sharing.






Royal everyday life: In the throne room we receive subjects for audiences and make decisions.



Royal everyday life: In the throne room we receive subjects for audiences and make decisions.

Source: Brave At Night




It's like this every day. For each application we have to make a decision, which sometimes has an effect the next morning, but often only late: make gold or food loose? Reject the application and lose loyalty points that quickly lead to lower tax revenues? Or send one of three precious agents who solve the problem for us but collect a whole lot of money? We quickly have to determine that the means are not enough at the back and front. Since we receive the supplicants in a fixed order, we do not see at a glance who wants what from us, which makes it difficult to allocate scarce resources. After all, if you misjudge yourself, you can fall back on automatic checkpoints that are created for every matchday.

Dark times

But Yes, Your Grace is more than just a wild accumulation of audiences, because the game is primarily held together by its neat story: after just a few minutes of play, war is emerging that threatens our entire kingdom. However, since we lack the means and troops, we ask other regents for help, which we also get promptly – but only for a hefty return. And then everything comes very, very terrible. For us, for our empire, for our family. Greetings from Game of Thrones.






The queen helps you not to lose sight of your goals.



The queen helps you not to lose sight of your goals.

Source: Brave At Night




What is interesting is the way the authors deal with fantasy elements. Monsters, legends and magic appear to be as omnipresent in history as they were in The Witcher, but in most cases they turn out to be sheer superstition. Through education to victory? An exciting approach, but one could have made more out of it, which unfortunately applies to many ideas in Yes, Your Grace: Again and again the story touches on serious, exciting topics, but remains too superficial to really do them justice.

Save us who can!

Over the next five to eight hours, we'll be much more concerned with preventing the worst, or rather, saving the bare minimum. Because although Yes, Your Grace also has its bright sides, we felt increasingly hopeless in the test. Supplies were running out, building an army was too expensive, and we could only use the bitterly needed agents in emergencies. And as soon as we thought we could finally have a grip on the situation, surprising story twists missed a few juicy kicks in the soft tissues.

It got really exciting, for example, when we were supposed to solve a murder and question all sorts of suspects and informants. We had little time for the investigation, some actions led to nothing – and in the end we lacked important evidence. Who was involved in the murder? Did we judge the right man? Whatever we did, it felt wrong. And that's what the game fully intends.






It all starts with a dramatic siege. We only find out late how it got this far.



It all starts with a dramatic siege. We only find out late how it got this far.

Source: Brave At Night




As we moved toward the dramatic finale, we were already painting our destiny in the darkest colors. Of course, we will not reveal how the story ended for us! Just so much: there are several possible ending sequences. Which one is achieved, however, depends on fewer decisions than we initially thought, because in fact many story twists are given by the developers. It is therefore often enough to keep yourself financially afloat and only do the bare essentials – the rest drives the story anyway. Even the few big battles that we have to master in the course of the game only take place in dialog form, we can never act tactically here. Although these scenes are exciting for the narrative, they are playfully the purest one-way streets.

Bland routine

Yes, Your Grace is not an open simulator or a full role-playing game, almost everything happens in a fixed sequence. Between audiences and story events there is always the same everyday life at the royal court: With our character, we click through a handful of rooms in which a family member occasionally waits to exchange a few sentences with us. There is no voice output, all of the figures only make incomprehensible gibberish to underline the dialogues a little. That is anything but atmospheric, but Yes, Your Grace can at least score with a really nice background music that creates a dense medieval atmosphere.






An important part of the story is dedicated to your daughters, but unfortunately many dialogue options fall short here.



An important part of the story is dedicated to your daughters, but unfortunately many dialogue options fall short here.

Source: Brave At Night




The conversations are interesting and (at least in the English version) well written, but unfortunately they offer only a few possibilities: Why can't we decide for ourselves when to address important events or to tease out helpful background information from the characters? The developers are giving away a lot of potential here.







For some tasks, you sometimes have to send your agents to nearby places. & Nbsp;



For some tasks, you sometimes have to send your agents to nearby places.

Source: Brave At Night




This also applies to the possibility of fulfilling small tasks for other nobles so that they form alliances with us. One ruler, for example, wants to allow some kind of drug trafficking on the court, the other campaigns for a strict ban. If we meet their conditions, we secure their followers, for example in the form of troops or resources. If we do not succeed, the character simply falls flat and no longer participates in the story. We also cannot develop alternative solutions, for example it is not possible to cheat or bribe someone unless the story provides for it. Dynamic intrigue games unfortunately do not occur, which also harms the replayability: With more open gameplay and greater freedom of choice, Yes, Your Grace would certainly have offered enough material for two or three attempts. So for most players, it should remain in one pass.

Yes, Your Grace is for PC on Steam or GOG available, the price is 17 euros. For around 8 euros you get the soundtrack, the bundle of game and MP3 album costs you just under 23 euros.

Solid story with surprising twists
Nice mix of different genres
Interesting decisions
Gnawing sense of threat creates tension
Atmospheric music
Despite decisions, story is largely linear
Monotonous daily routine
Many game elements are very superficial
Little freedom in dialogues
Only gibberish instead of real speech
Low-detail retro look
Many exciting topics are only touched upon
Low replay value

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